Another trail half marathon under the belt, and a step closer to UTE 2018.

 

The route

Now in it’s sixth year, the race starts right along the river, through into nearby farming fields, and back towards Henley Bridge. The final ~ 2km takes you along the river again to where you started, and there is a final lap around the race village.

 

Why do it?

  • A good, family-friendly open event to all running abilities.
  • Great chance to stretch the legs, and get me back into a mindset of this is what long distance trail feels like.

Find out more more: henleyhalfmarathon.co.uk

 

Finish

I finsihed with a time of 02:10:08, so not too bad for what I’m training  for (still feel like I coud’ve shaved those 10 minutes off), but a good, fairly relaxing day nontheless.

Tips

  • Give plenty of time to arrive and leave: Henley has notoriously narrow, winding roads which on a sunny weekend will get clogged up with traffic. Give yourself plenty of time to get there so you can register and warm up. When leaving, make sure you’re not in a rush back for anything. It took us around 40 minutes just to leave the town centre
  • Parking: There’s a huge field open for parking, and it’s pretty well organised. The challenge we had was actually finding it! The map and postcode given didn’t really help with the Sat Nav, and we ended up following cars around to the car park. Check with the race organisers if you’re unsure.
  • Bring family and friends: Open field with food and drinks stands, and in sunny weather it’s a great place to go for a walk. Clare was happy she had a fluffy friend to hang out with at the race village. His name is Johnny. And of course, he has his own instagram page
  • Final ~2km – be carful of that sprint finish: The final couple of km takes you along the river, towards the race village, but then loops back around before you see the finish line. Keep this in mind. As you’re running down along the river, don’t go for that sprint finish just yet. You’ve still got another 1km to go. That doesn’t sound so bad, but we did see a few people hit a mini mental wall when they were in sight of the race village, thinking they were on the final few steps. Keep going!
  • Public walkers: As the event organisers say, they do their absolute best to waymark the route, but the paths and streets used are still open to the public. Keep an eye out for dog walkers and families out strolling

 

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